Paris & Amsterdam

Hello A-Team:

The following group of pictures are a bit mixed up.  I could not get the pictures to move where I wanted them to go.  After a while, on a tour, you begin to forget where you are, what time it is, and events seem to merge.  Enjoy.

Men’a Jacket circa: 1780. Worn with it’s waistcoat, shown in next picture. Clothworkers Center, London.
Notice that the back is way shorter than the front. This is something that is popular today.
Roberto Cavalli. March 2017. Paris. So it is my opinion, that in men’s clothes, history is is repeating itself. I love this. I would wear it.
This is an offering from the House of Chanel. Paris. Notice how the bleach design is matched directly over the seams. I did not catch the price. I wonder, how it was done? Intriguing. N’est pas?
I saw this piece. It is only about 4 inches long. Unbelievable. Paris. Next door to the Louve.
This is a doll carrying case from the Tassen Museum of Bags & Purses in Amsterdam. 19th century.
Women’s Fine Sewing Purse. Tassen Museum.
Ivory Purse. 1920’s. Tassen.
Sewing Basket. 19th Century. Tassen. I have no idea what the stars were for. All I can think of, is that they wound thread around them.
I had a definite problem in Chanel. I just could not stop crying. These are the steps where Chanel showed her collections. They took pictures of me and my daughter. No idea if we have the same or different kinds or cancer.
Kate would not get this, from Agent Provocateur, Paris. It is from Vivienne Westwood’s son’s collection.
Paris Chocolatier. There is one on every corner. This was strict window shopping. All three pictures are from the same shop.
Yes, the giant chess pieces are chocolate, too. Fabulous!!!
Professional egg boiler. Time your own, just the way you like your eggs. Paris.
16th – 18th century purse handles. The fabric purses just didn’t survive. Tassen.
Paris Chocolatier. There is one on every corner. This was strict window shopping. All three pictures are from the same shop.
Tassen Museum. Amsterdam. Drawers. The words on the chest of drawers indicated what was stored in the drawers.
Tassen Museum. Amsterdam. Drawers. The words on the chest of drawers indicated what was stored in the drawers. I could find no date on this. I suspect it was made during WW1. There is NOTHING plastic about this. Just great inginuity.
Fish Delicatessen. Amsterdam. The husband & wife are the owners. Everything was so fresh here.
Lingerie Fabric Shop in Amsterdam. Great prices.
Part of button wall in Amsterdam’s Fabric Shop.
Fabric Shop Sign. Amsterdam.
I took this picture for Diana, our hatmaker instructor. I think it is 19th century top hat mold-stretcher.
Paris sign for fresh fish.
This is a picture of the display by the sign. Again: Everything was very fresh.
Kosher Butcher Shop in Paris.
Paris. Grocery store shelf signage. To my surprise, it was all digital. I have not seen this in the states…..yet…..
At a Paris dinner we saw this framed lace. Very intricate. No idea if it is lingerie or part of a dress.
One of the buildings from the Louve, Paris.
The pyramid. Where you buy your tickets and get into the Louve. Paris. I never made it inside. I was in awe of the Musee de Arts Decortifs, which houses the Musee de Mode & Textiles. The museum I was at, was next door. Separate entrance. Separate entrance fee.
Inside the Musee de Arts Decortifs, which houses the Musee de Mode & Textiles, you were not allowed to take pictures of the exhibits. Behind these doors, was an exhibit of cross dressers, LGBTQ, thoughout the ages. The exhibition was cataloged. I bought the book which was written in French. It was an amazing exhibit. Joan of Arc, was condemned because she liked wearing men’s breeches. And she would not give it up.
8 hour latex class in Amsterdam. You need plenty of ventilation to do this. Best learning experience of the tour !!!
In the latex class, lots of the ladies made panties. These are for a wonder woman costume.
Amsterdam bistro presentation of plate of raviolis.
Amsterdam bistro presentation of Cesear Salad.
This little shelf sign, is in our Amsterdam Mercure Hotel. It says alot with very little words.